B-26 Marauder 320th bomb group

 

 

 

Home 
Editor's Message 
History 
Missions 
Photo Archive 
Film Clips 
Stories 
320th Aircraft 
Reunion Assoc. 
Memorials 
POWs 
Books/Art 
Bulletin Board 
Roster 
Remembrances 
Memorabilia 
Links 
Search 
Contact me 

 

 


 


I am an American documentary filmmaker, I can be verified at www.imdb.com - type in Tony Schweikle. I would like to find anyone with knowledge of the mission to Sapri Italy on August 15 or 19 in 1943.

Thank you,
Tony Schweikle
12/1/2009

[ ]
   


I saw the 2009 reunion on the 320th Bomber Group website.  I wonder if any of  you surviving members knew my Father Jack Jarman or John P. Jarman.  He flew in the 444th bomber group with Chuck Kamanski, James Beebe, James Logsdon, Moose Fowler, (who was killed in action), Goldman, who was also a bombardier, Kelly who was the tail gunner who I think also got shot down.  My father passed away last year in January 2009 at the age of 91.  He was living in our home and fell and broke his second hip.  He had hip replacement surgery but did not bounce back from this surgery.  If any of you have any remembrances of him or even stories of your time in the 320th, I would like to hear them.  I read the book Blue Battlefields and really liked it, and it mirrored my dad’s stories of how they flew to the Ascension Islands, up through Africa and down on the other side of the Mediterranean, how they flew out of Corsica. 

I am 52 years old, have lived a legacy of life so far, with 6 children ages 27 to 7, married 28 years.  My wall is filled with pictures of my father.  I have the greatest respect for what you did as young men in your service and the greatness of your youth. 

Michael Jarman
11/25/09

[ ]
  


On behalf of my Dad, Malcolm L. Scott, a pilot in the 320BG, I want to thank you for this outstanding website. "Scotty" always told stories of his experiences during the war, remembering those who returned with him and those who did not. He made it a point to attend most of the reunions.  He passed away in May, 2002, but I think about him always.  GOOD LUCK to all!

John (his son),
11/20/09

[ ] 


I would like to thank the surviving members of the 320th BG that served with my DAD John H. Eastburn. As I honor him and his memory along with all the other vets past and present.

THANK YOU !     


Charles W. Eastburn
USAF VET

11/16/09

[ ] 


Looking to see if anyone remembers a George W. McQuade 444 ? He was a LT. and served his country well. I am looking to see if I can find any pictures of him and find out what he was on. Please contact me if you know of him or know someone that does.

Thank you,

Dianna
10/5/09

[ ] 


It was a pleasure to attend the 2009 reunion in San Antonio and see you all.  I took a good number of photos while attending, including group and squadron photos.  I have emailed some reunion attendees with a link to my Walmart Photo page in order to access the photos.  If you did not get this email and would like to be able to access the photos, please CLICK HERE.

Once you access them in addition to viewing them all, you can order prints via the Walmart web site.  If you have trouble accessing the photos, please let me know and we'll find another way to get them to you.  I hope to see you in Chicago next year!

Kind regards,

Joe Seiley
Son of SGT Robert E. Seilehy
320th BG, 443rd BS
10/4/09

[ ]


Hello, may I say first that I love this site.

My father – Martin A Carter was in the 320th – 443rd from the inception of the group until after the end of the war.  He told very few stories about the war period other than:

1. hating Patton – but talked about  El Alamane (spelling?)  He talked of the strategy before Paton of one tank a day up the mountain.  With Patton, MANY tanks went up at one time and the battle was won.
2. a friend that lost his fingers – on  beach – as they looked at a disabled German Vehicle.
3. trading cigarettes for 5 cameos, that each grand daughter now has one of – plus my wife.  He sent these back.
4. riding on the Queen Mary from New Jersey.5.
a period when the aircraft were having many mechanical problems and the commander having the ground crews ride with their planes.  He talked about how all improved and how he appreciated the commander.
6. not being rotated back to the states until well after the war was over.
7. not being able to bring home his silverware – he was allowed 0 to come home with him. He said that he had carried those mess utensils for years and he really wanted these.
8. lighting cigars with Italian money – that had been declared worthless – later to be revalued.
9. drinking wine – once when a full cellar was discovered.
10. being in Nuremberg the day that the Germans surrendered
11. Guarding a camp after the war that was full of pregnant German women – “superwomen”
12. seeing a train that was full of people going to a concentration camp – it was liberated.  But their condition was bad.

This is every story that dad ever talked about in my life – I wrote them out. Each in a few words for the grandkids to have later.

Mom talked about camp life as she followed him until they had orders to go to New Jersey.

Dad would not answer questions.   When my brother was having problems after Vietnam, dad pulled him to the side and said that some things you just have to live with and go on with life.  That was his philosophY.

During the war, my mom was not allowed to spend a dime of her allotment – her dad, made this rule.  So as the troops were returning home and buying farms, my granddad helped my mom get a good farm before the good ones were bought and used the saved allotment for it.  Mom and dad farmed and raised dairy cattle for a few years.  As times were bad, dad got a job in town – at a veteran’s hospital – night guard and boiler man.  Farmed by day and worked at night.

After a few years, he sold the farm and downsized to 20 acres to raise a few head of cattle and work in town.  By now the family included 2 boys.  Myself and my older brother.   We moved to Moore, OK in 1962.  they lived in that same house until both passed.

He worked at two different air force bases until approx 1980. He worked on fire control systems.  He took an early retirement and worked for school systems for another 10 years.  He retired finally for health reasons.  He fought leukemia for years until 1997.  Mom survived him for a few months.  He was a good Christian man.  He was a 32nd degree Mason.

He used to visit a man named Clark in St Louis or KC?  He went to one reunion?

I always wished that i knew more about his war years … after he and mom passed, I found his stripes, a few ribbons, shoulder patches, his ID card, a letter giving the unit the French medal, a  few photos – most are not labeled as who they are.  I shared these with the web site already.

Now I would like to know if anyone can help me know more?

A. what did an engineer / gunner do on the plane and from where?
B. Does anyone remember dad?
C. He flew a lot of missions early in the war and after that?
D. Dad was a sgt, s/sgt, and then a cpl in May 1943 – based on crew records.  ?????
E. The pilot that he flew with is named Tresch.
F. His crew did not use the same plane on most missions?

Any information about my dad would be appreciated  

-Thanks for this site and the thoughts behind it!

John Carter
9/17/09

[ ]


I appreciate the detailed information on your website. I would like to report that my late father-in-law, Jesse Willard (Will) Largent, who is listed as a 320th BG POW on your site (bailed out on 13 Aug 1944 from a burning B-26 near Toulon, France) survived the war. He lived to be almost 79 years old and before passing away authored the book RAF WINGS OVER FLORIDA, about the training of WW II British air crews in central Florida.

The New York Herald Tribune article about Will being held as a POW by a Nazi medical unit, but later receiving the surrender of the commanding German admiral is
here.

For information on Will's book,
see here.

Thanks for all the hard work you have invested in your website -- it is a wonderful source of information on those who served our country.

Kind regards,

Thorold (Tod) Roberts, Editor
RAF WINGS OVER FLORIDA
9/7/09

[ ] 


My name is George W. Sholl, III and my father was George W. Sholl, Jr. He was a Flight Officer in the 442nd Bomb Squadron toward the end of the war. He later rejoined the USAF and died in 1963. I'd be very interested in hearing from anyone in the 320th BG Association who knew or flew with him.  (earlier, in researching my father's record, I had received a letter from a 320th member, but it was stolen in a burglery).

Many thanks,

George Sholl
6/26/09

[ ] 


My great uncle was Lt.  James (Jim) N. Hipple, he was a pilot in the 441st.  James died on 13 August 1944 over France.  I have read the missing crew reports and mission summaries, but I am always in search of information.  If anyone knew James or has heard any stories regarding him it would be greatly appreciated.  Also, if anyone knows/knew or knows how to contact Rudolf Oppenheimer, Vincent Borg, Harold Waldrop, James Largent, or Robert Allen – his crew on that day, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thankyou,

William Jones
6/8/09

[ ] 


My Dad, Dean S. Gausche, was with the 320th during the Korean War.  He passed away, way too young in 1975.  I am trying to compile some stories for our children and our grandchildren about their grandfather.  If anyone knew him during his time with the 320th I would appreciate it if you could contact me.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Susan H. Donahue
5/26/09

[ ] 


I am searching for information about my dad, James L. Murray, who served in the 320th Bomb Group, 441st squadron, in WWII.  My dad passed away in 1985 after 30 years active duty and 15 years civil service.  Any information would be tremendously appreciated.

God Bless.

Jacqueline Murray Ferrara
5/23/09

[ ] 


Hello, I am looking for anyone who might remember my uncle William Walter Claude West. He was shot while on duty at the base in Tunisia.

Thank you,

Kim West-Righetti
5/16/09

[ ]


My name is Marie-Jeanne Chanut, I am French and I was born on 26 March 1946 in Dijon, France.

I am looking for information about my father, Carl Taylor. I have been looking for him for years unsuccessfully and I was hoping someone might be able to help me. His name is Carl Taylor (I don't know of a middle name). He arrived in Dijon in November 1944. He was part of the 310th Service Group squadron, support unit of 320th Bomb Group, based in Dijon-Longvic. The 310th Service Group headquarters was based in Rue Verrerie, Dijon.

He was driving a jeep, matriculated "1TAF 310" (First TAF). He was a mechanic or radio-operator. My father can be seen on the 320th Bomb Group website under Archives/Crews/10th photo (File No. C0010). There is a group of 8 men in front of the "Spillin Kitten" plane, my father is the 3rd from the right, cap up and left hand on the left pocket of his jacket. I am wondering if the person who posted this photo would be able to send it to me in a higher resolution. Also, it would be very useful if I could know the names of the men around him on the photo. I have also posted a photo of my father and his insignia that he gave my grandmother when he left Dijon in 1945, and a photo of the 310th Service Group squadron headquarters on a website
here:

I hope someone would remember him and could tell me if he is still alive? My father probably does not know of my existence.  I wish he could be informed about my research and be given my contact details to get in touch with me.

If unfortunately, he is dead, I would like to know where he rests if possible; I would come over and pay tribute to him.

Here are a few photos:

 


Carl Taylor

 


My father Carl Taylor
3rd from the right


310th Headquarters

Yours faithfully,

Marie-Jeanne Chanut
4/29/09

[ ]   


This has been a great find for me. My dad's youngest brother and my namesake, Bruister H. LeNoir, was with 444th and was killed in action on Dec. 18 1942. He is memorialized in Tunisia. Is there any way to find specifically what plane he flew on and who the pilot and crew were that he served with? What about the circumstances of their service including their final flight? Thanks in advance,

Bruister LeNoir
1/31/09

[


Robert E. Clark, listed in the Memorials, was my paternal uncle. He was a prisoner in Germany. He came home after the war to Ohio and in October 1948, his body was found on a railroad track. It was a suspected murder. No culprit was ever found. He never married and was only 27.

Mary Clark Gilchrist
1/3/09

[ ]  


Hi my name is Robert T. Luther.

I am the son of Robert C. Luther . I would like to know if any of you guys can tell me the name of the plane my dad flew on and if you have any picture of him and the crew he flew with. Also if you have any stories about him I would love to hear from you . Hope all of you guys are well & good and thanks for all you have done for our country. Also I think my dad flew with the 443rd squadron.

Thanks  and God bless,

Robert T. Luther
1/1/09

[ ]  
 


 


Copyright(c) 2010 320th B.G. Reunion Association. All rights reserved.

 

affordable hostingBest Website Builder